Be safe, be seen on Halloween

29 10 2015

Halloween is here and there will be lots of kids running around  in the dark.  Take precautions with your kids and make sure they are visible to cars.   Here are a few tips:

  1. Children should be given a flashlight to help them see where they are going in the dark and also to be seen by others easier.
  2. Consider using face paint instead of masks to help children see to get around better.  At least make sure the eye holes are large enough so as not to obstruct their vision.
  3. Reflective tape can be attached to costumes and clothing to make them more visible as well.
  4. If a sword, cane, or stick is a part of your child’s costume, make sure it is not sharp or too long. A child may be easily hurt by these accessories if he stumbles or trips.
  5. Do not use decorative contact lenses without an eye examination and a prescription from an eye care professional.  While the packaging on decorative lenses will often make claims such as “one size fits all,” or “no need to see an eye specialist,” obtaining decorative contact lenses without a prescription is both dangerous and illegal.  This can cause pain, inflammation, and serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to permanent vision loss or blindness.
  6. Teach children how to call 9-1-1 (or their local emergency number) if they have an emergency or become lost.
  7. You might want to go out early before total darkness as well to make it safer for your children.
  8. And put your pets, especially cats,  somewhere safe.  Unfortunately, people do mean things to animals.  Better to be safe as well as protecting kids from animal bites since there will be lots of pet anxiety that night with all the activity and noise.

For the safest environment and a more positive atmosphere,  instead of trick or treating, consider bringing your kids to the Fall festival at the Moore County Community Building in Dumas  Halloween night.   Activities to include bouncy castles, concession foods, games, crazy cardboard maze, free give aways, prizes, & TONS of CANDY!!  And all the dentists say, “Yes!”

 

Courtesy of Dumas Vision Source, PLLC and Dr Tory W. Moore, Optometric Glaucoma Specialist.    Serving the Dumas, Texas,  Moore County and upper Texas Panhandle area for 25 years.   Call (806) 935-2020 for appointment or visit our optical gallery without an appointment.  Connect on Twitter @eyedocdumas and like our Facebook business page:  Dumas Vision Source You also can visit our website www.visionsource-dumas.com for more information.   Tory Moore, OD  – “A Hometown Eye Doctor You Know and Can Trust!”





SnackPak 4 Kids and Transitions Lenses Special

17 07 2014

SnackPak 4 Kids is feeding hungry school age kids this summer and we want to help.   We support this program and we would like to team up for July and August 2014 to help them out.  If a patient brings in a 16 oz (small) jar of peanut butter or a box of Pop Tarts for SnackPak (or better yet Both!) and buys a Transitions lens add-on to their spectacle lenses, we will give them 50% off that price of the Transitions‘ add on cost(about a $45 dollar savings).   A collection container is by our front door.

Even if you do not buy any eyewear, you are welcome to drop off your donation of peanut butter or PopTarts at our office.  

It’s not the kid’s fault that they go hungry.   Studies are showing when the kids are not going hungry, they do better in school.  If they can get through school with a good education and not drop out, perhaps the generational poverty cycle can be broken.

If you have any questions about our offer, you can contact our office at 935-2020 or information about the SnackPak program in Dumas at SnackPak 4 Kids Dumas.  Thanks for your support of SnackPak 4 Kids and Dumas Vision Source.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

The following information is from SnackPak 4 Kids website (http://snackpak4kids.org/history)

“It began with 10 hungry students at Will Rogers Elementary School in Amarillo.  Bushland couple Dyron and Kelly Howell had discovered that Amarillo was the largest city west of Dallas without a weekend backpack program. And yet more than 3,200 children in the Amarillo Independent School District relied only on the meals served to them at school for their weekly food. That meant hundreds of children spent their nights and weekends hungry.

Determined to find some way to address this need, the Howells assembled ten bags of food that could be prepared without adult supervision—juice boxes, peanut butter, sandwich snack crackers, breakfast cereal, Pop-Tarts, fruit cups and more. On Friday, September 3, 2010, the first ten Snack Pak 4 Kids recipients were given those bags, which contained enough food to get them through the weekend. The Howells prepared the bags again the next week, and got others involved. Soon the number of children grew, and then the program expanded to other schools. Teachers began seeing academic improvement, better concentration, and higher attendance among SP4K recipients.
As of early 2014, the program has grown to serve 5,200 students in 30 school districts, Amarillo, Booker, Borger, Bushland, Canadian, Clarendon, Clayton NM, Dalhart, Dimmitt, Dumas, Friona, Fritch, Happy, Hereford, Highland Park, Lockney, Panhandle, Pampa, Perryton, River Road, Spearman, San Antonio, Stratford, Sunray, Tahoka, Texhoma, Texline, Tulia, White Deer, and Wildorado.

Every week, hundreds of volunteers pack 14 regular, nutritious items into plastic bags and deliver these bags to participating schools.  At the schools, officials discreetly place these bags in students’ backpacks on Fridays. Students receiving the bags have each been identified by school staff members (counselors, nurses, teachers or principals) as living in a “food-insecure” household—which means these families don’t always know the source of their next meal. The SP4K program feeds each elementary student and any siblings at home not old enough to attend school.

Our new Snack Shak program currently provides food to middle school and high school students, and is expanding quickly.”

————————————————————————————————————————————————

Courtesy of Dumas Vision Source, PLLC and Dr Tory W. Moore, Optometric Glaucoma Specialist and Diplomate of the American Board of Optometry.    Serving the Dumas, Texas,  Moore County and upper Texas Panhandle area for 23 years.   Call (806) 935-2020 for appointment or visit our optical gallery without an appointment.  Visit our website www.visionsource-dumas.com for more information.  Like our Facebook business page:  Dumas Vision Source  and you can also connect on Twitter @eyedocdumas

Tory Moore, OD  – “A Hometown Eye Doctor You Know and Can Trust!”





Are School Vision Screenings Good Enough?

30 12 2013

I often get asked by parents of children I am prescribing glasses for, “How come they passed the vision screening at school but still need glasses?”

While school nurses provide a valuable service that sometimes detect serious problems with children’s vision, school vision screenings are an incomplete check of a child’s visual status.

For one, a screening is just that – a screening.  Screenings are looking for a big problem in a large amount of people in a short period of time.  It might catch the big things but it leaves alot of little things hidden.   Kids are masters of manipulation too.  Some can fool the nurse that they can see well while some kids can fail that don’t need glasses.

Secondly, the criteria of what defines reduced vision is generally 20/30 vision or worse looking off into the distance.   For some kids, that is too blurry for their needs.  That is the minimum to get a Texas driver’s license and be able to see road signs adequately.  Most of the time, the near vision of school children is not even tested in a school vision screening.  But that is where they use their vision the most!

The biggest group I find need glasses that have passed a screening are farsighted.  Farsighted children generally can see at all places.  Often they can force their eyes to focus to make their eyes see 20/20 at distance and near.  They generally have headaches or eye strain, are slow readers and do poorly with reading comprehension, don’t do well with their grades, labeled incorrectly “dyslexic”, and get in trouble for not paying attention.

Also, the degree of focusing power or accommodation is not tested as well as eye coordination or how the eyes work as a team either.   The vision system of the eyes is very complex.  You are using two eyes that each have to have clear sight, keep things focused in and work in tandem as they move around.  Can you imagine holding two video cameras steady in each hand and trying to video something moving around and try to make a movie that takes both video feeds, in focus, and produces one single picture on the TV?

Lastly, the health of the child’s eye is not examined.  True, there are not a lot of eye diseases at young ages but they do happen.  Diabetes, blood disorders, genetic problems and most importantly tumors in the eye or brain are some things I have come across without much or any symptoms.

I have occasionally had a nurse that went the extra mile and did more than what the school district recommends and I commend them for that.  They perform a vital role that helps find the big problems sometimes.  But don’t rely on  just a school vision screening.  The future of your child depends so much on how well they do in school.  Why would you not want to ensure your child has a normal vision system and healthy eyes?   They can’t be replaced like teeth.  Don’t skimp on this critical need in your child’s development.  Have your children’s eyes tested by a reputable private practice optometrist and please don’t take them to them a mall doc or Bigmart type place.  There generally is a reason those eyedocs work in those type settings.  You don’t get your teeth or mammogram at Bigmart do you?  At any rate, don’t take any chances with your kids.  Make a point to have your children’s eyes regularly, every year,  in a professional setting.

Courtesy of Dumas Vision Source, PLLC and Dr Tory W. Moore, Optometric Glaucoma Specialist and Diplomate of the American Board of Optometry.    Serving the Dumas, Texas,  Moore County and upper Texas Panhandle area for 23 years.   Call (806) 935-2020 for appointment or visit our optical gallery without an appointment.  Visit our website www.visionsource-dumas.com for more information.  Like our Facebook business page:  Dumas Vision Source  and you can also connect on Twitter @eyedocdumas

Tory Moore, OD  – “A Hometown Eye Doctor You Know and Can Trust!”





Back to School Time…. Can Your Kids Use Their Eyes Well To Learn?

22 08 2013

c0016751It’s that time again.  Summer is over and time for the routines to start again.  “Get your homework done, get your clothes laid out for tomorrow, do you have lunch money?, get to bed.”  Ah, the joys of parenthood.

We do those things because we love our kids though and we want the best for them.  We  teach them so one day they can be on their own.  To be able to learn and succeed in life.

Have you ever stopped to think that you may be neglecting one of the most important aspects of learning for your kids? Their vision.  Vision consists of more than just seeing 20/20 on an eye chart or having a school nurse check them at school or at the doctor’s office.  Just because they appear to be able to “see things” doesn’t mean their vision functions properly.

Not only does an eyeball have to focus light from far away onto the back of the eyeball (the retina) clearly, it has to use eye muscles for near vision (accommodate), and do this in co-ordination with another eyeball that are both connected with 6 extra-ocular muscles working in tandem.  It then has to send these light signals from the eye to the brain where our brain’s perception interprets what we see.  There is a lot going on there.   Anything that disrupts any of those systems can cause the vision system to be affected and make it harder to see and likewise learn.

Did you know 80% of learning comes from what we see?  (AOA)   Signs that may indicate a child has vision problem include:

  • Frequent eye rubbing or blinking
  • Short attention span
  • Avoiding reading and other close activities
  • Frequent headaches
  • Covering one eye
  • Tilting the head to one side
  • Holding reading materials close to the face
  • An eye turning in or out
  • Seeing double
  • Losing place when reading
  • Difficulty remembering what he or she read

It makes sense that if a child is uncomfortable doing schoolwork or reading because it makes his eyes tired or the letters move around the page or just doesn’t make sense due to a perception problem are not going to do well in school.   I don’t want to do hard work naturally either if I don’t have to!

Many children are mislabeled as ADHD or have poor attention because of this.

Please have your children examined by a reputable eye doctor, not at a quickie, Bigmart store or at the mall, to ensure their complete vision system is working well.   They must be able to ensure you if your child is seeing 20/20,  that they are not farsighted at all.  Also that their focusing is good, their eye coordination is good and eye health is normal at a minimum.   Too many kids are labeled dyslexic as well because of simple, undiagnosed eye problems and then they have that stigma placed on them for no reason as well as delaying their development unnecessarily.

If you haven’t had your children’s eyes examined this year, why wait any longer?   Don’t let them get behind.

Courtesy of Dumas Vision Source, PLLC and Dr Tory W. Moore, Optometric Glaucoma Specialist.    Serving the Dumas, Texas,  Moore County and upper Texas Panhandle area for 23 years.   Call (806) 935-2020 for appointment or visit our optical gallery without an appointment.  Connect on Twitter @eyedocdumas  and like our Facebook business page:  Dumas Vision Source You also can visit our website www.visionsource-dumas.com for more information.   Tory Moore, OD  – “A Hometown Eye Doctor You Know and Can Trust!”





Halloween Safety

24 10 2011

Halloween is here and there will be lots of kids running around  in the dark.  Take precautions with your kids and make sure they are visible to cars.   Here are a few tips:

  1. Children should be given a flashlight to help them see where they are going in the dark and also to be seen by others easier.
  2. Consider using face paint instead of masks to help children see to get around better.  At least make sure the eye holes are large enough so as not to obstruct their vision.
  3. Reflective tape can be attached to costumes and clothing to make them more visible as well.
  4. If a sword, cane, or stick is a part of your child’s costume, make sure it is not sharp or too long. A child may be easily hurt by these accessories if he stumbles or trips.
  5. Do not use decorative contact lenses without an eye examination and a prescription from an eye care professional.  While the packaging on decorative lenses will often make claims such as “one size fits all,” or “no need to see an eye specialist,” obtaining decorative contact lenses without a prescription is both dangerous and illegal.  This can cause pain, inflammation, and serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to permanent vision loss or blindness.
  6. Teach children how to call 9-1-1 (or their local emergency number) if they have an emergency or become lost.
  7. You might want to go out early before total darkness as well to make it safer for your children.
  8. And put your pets, especially cats,  somewhere safe.  Unfortunately, people do mean things to animals.  Better to be safe as well as protecting kids from animal bites since there will be lots of pet anxiety that night with all the activity and noise.

For the safest environment and a more positive atmosphere,  instead of trick or treating, consider bringing your kids to the Fall festival at the Moore County Community Building in Dumas  Halloween night.   Activities to include bouncy castles, concession foods, games, crazy cardboard maze, free give aways, prizes, & TONS of CANDY!!  And all the dentists say, “Yes!”

Courtesy of Dumas Vision Source, PLLC and Dr Tory W. Moore, Optometric Glaucoma Specialist.    Serving the Dumas, Texas,  Moore County and upper Texas Panhandle area for 25 years.   Call (806) 935-2020 for appointment or visit our optical gallery without an appointment.  Connect on Twitter @eyedocdumas and like our Facebook business page:  Dumas Vision Source You also can visit our website www.visionsource-dumas.com for more information.   Tory Moore, OD  – “A Hometown Eye Doctor You Know and Can Trust!”